How to get the most out of a trial lesson

Finding the right teacher is key to making progress during lessons, which is why so many studios offer trial lessons or meet & greet lessons. These could be free (which they are at Milo Music) or you may have to pay a small fee. Be prepared to try more than one teacher before finding one that suits you and your family.


To make the most of your trial lesson, it’s helpful to do some prep work. Take the time to think about why music lessons.


For the positive experience?

To do exams or performances?

How often will they realistically practice during the week?

What style of music?


Use these answers to determine your questions for the music teacher. If your kid wants to sit exams, ask about what programs she teaches from and what those exams look like. If this is meant to be a positive introduction to music, ask about their flexibility in music choices and how they support well rounded music education. You can write down your questions so you can ask them either before or during the trial lesson. Or even email them to us so you get a full complete answer.


Remember that trial lessons are not meant to teach loads of concepts or pieces. The teacher will be focusing on building rapport and excitement for music. If they are covering simple things that your kid easily grasps, don’t take it to mean your kid won’t be challenged later in their lessons.


After the trial lesson, ask your kid what they thought. Also consider how you felt about the teacher and the studio. Was it a generally clean and welcoming place? Did the teacher seem overall happy and excited to be teaching? Were they willing to answer questions from both you and your kid? Did they address your kid and attempt to talk with them directly?


Overall, remember that you and your kid deserves a teacher who is willing to work with you to achieve your musical goals, whatever they may be.


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